Posted by: scribe9 | August 23, 2010

A multitude of mailboxes

In a fifteen-minute walk through my neighborhood here, I see a far greater variety of mailboxes than I do in my neighborhood back in the states. There’s only one that looks like a typical American mailbox, and it’s just a sidekick for a brick one:

The butterflies were quite popular once upon a time. I’ve seen them fluttering around half a dozen of these old boxes:

Others fairly popular over the years:

Lots are home-made. This one doesn’t want anything but addressed mail: the fine print specifically bans circulars (which here are the newsprint advertisements that in the US are usually stuffed into newspapers) and both weekly shoppers (which bear an astonishing resemblance to each other–there aren’t that many PR releases that appear each week–but apparently the advertisers don’t care).

In this country of brick, stucco, and tile houses, masonry mailboxes are popular:

My not-terribly-well-educated guess is that this was hand-painted by a descendant of Dalmatian immigrants:

Most are pretty self-effacing, as mailboxes go–not surprising given the Kiwi psyche. I’m not sure what inspired the paint job on this one:

 

Plastic mailboxes like this are becoming popular, but the flag is unlikely to do any good. In this neighborhood, the postie comes by on a bicycle and delivers, but doesn’t pick up, mail. So to post a letter one walks to the dairy (convenience store) up on the highway, and puts it in this box, which lives inside the store at night:

And last but not least, here’s our mailbox–another homemade job. We’ve got mail!

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